Recruit Training Command

Boot Camp

Recruit Training Command History was not an orinially part of the book and has been added since "The Cradle of the Navy" was published. This history is from the commands historical files that were submitted as part of the US Navy's historical program and the files were dated from 1951.

 

 

RECRUIT TRAINING COMMAND

COMMAND HISTORICAL REPORT

PART  I

 

DESCRIPTION OF MISSIONS OR FUNCTIONS AND HOW THEY HAVE CHANGED

THROUGH THE YEARS

MISSION

To provide a program which will effect a smooth transition from civilian to Navy life; promote the

dignity of the individual, inculcate understanding and appreciation of the fundamental workings of democracy and the Navy's place in democracy; develop a desire for self-improvement and advancement; promote high standards of responsibility, conduct, manners, and morale; provide sufficient knowledge and skill in seamanship, ordnance and gunnery and other Naval subjects to enable the recruit to be of early usefulness to the Service; develop observation of Naval customs and traditions and stress pride in self and in the Navy.


 

COMMAND HISTORICAL REPORT

PART II

RESUME OF THE COMMAND'S DEVELOPMENT

COMMAND HISTORY

In April, 1944, the Secretary of the Navy changed the status of the Training Station to that of a group command and redesignated it the U. S. Naval Training Center, San Diego. Under the Center Commander were established three subordinate commands: The Recruit Training Command, The Service School Command and the Administrative Command.

            The years immediately following World War II saw a considerable reduction in population of the Training Center despite a post-war expansion of the Service Schools, and by the end of 1949 the population of the Center had dropped to a twenty-year low of 5, 800 men. Six months later, when the Communists invaded the Republic of Korea, an immediate expansion of all Naval Training activities took place and by September of 1950 the Center was again operating at nearly full capacity.

            During the early months of the Korean conflict it became apparent that the demand for trained personnel in the rapidly growing Pacific Fleet would require further expansion of the training center. Accordingly steps were taken by the Navy Department to reactivate Camp

Elliott, formerly a World War II Marine Corps training camp which is located ten miles north of San Diego on Kearny Mesa. On 15 January 1951 Camp Elliott was placed in commission as Elliott Annex of the Naval Training Center for the purpose of conducting the primary phases of recruit training. In March 1953, in line with the planned reduction in size of the Navy, training at Elliott Annex was discontinued and it was placed in an inactive status. During its two years of operation, over 150, 000 recruits received training there.

Late in 1952 projects were approved to convert some recruit barracks into classrooms and to extend training facilities by construction of a permanent recruit camp on the undeveloped Training Center land lying to the south and west of the estuary. The six converted barracks went into service as recruit classrooms in April 1953, and construction work on the new camp reached completion in 1955. With the completion of this project the Naval Training Center has filled out to its present boundaries of 435 acres.

 


 

CHRONOLOGY OF IMPORTANT DATES

 

On 27 July 1949, the USS RECRUIT (TDE-l) was completed. The RECRUIT is modeled after a destroyer-escort type vessel and contains eight classrooms where instruction in many phases of seamanship is given. Practical demonstration of shipboard procedures, nomenclature and routine is made possible by employing the standard Navy gear with which the ship is equipped.

 

On 20 June 1953, the Honorable Robert B. Anderson, Secretary of the Navy, visited the Naval Training Center and was reviewing officer at the weekly Recruit Brigade Review.

 

On 21 October 1953, the Honorable John A. Hannah, Assistant Secretary of Defense, visited the Naval Training Center and inspected the Recruit Training Command.

 

On 16 March 1954, Regiment TWO was disestablished as an active recruit regimental organization and its remaining functions were incorporated into the Regiment THREE organization.

 

On Armed Forces Day, 15 May 1955, the Honorable Charles S. Thomas, Secretary of the Navy, was reviewing officer at the Recruit Brigade Review.

 

The Chief of Naval Personnel ordered that recruit training be shortened and on 18 October 1954 the "Civilian to Sailor" transition was cut from eleven weeks to nine weeks. In order to stimulate the recruitment of naval enlistees, the Navy Department authorized the procurement and formation of "All City", "All County" and “All State" companies to be ordered to the Training Centers and trained as a unit. Recruiting Service Note. No.211-54 set forth the program on 1 November 1954 and the first company received at this center was the Kansas Company, Company 54-0365 on 20

November 1954. Twenty eight special companies have been received under this program through August 1955.

 

Admiral Robert B. Carney, U. S. Navy, Chief of Naval Operations, visited the Training Center on 24 June 1955 and was given a conducted tour of Recruit Training Command.

 

On 13 August 1955, the Honorable Richard-M. Nixon, Vice President of the United States was reviewing officer at the weekly Recruit Brigade Review, lunched with recruits in the new camp Nimitz galley, and was given a conducted tour of Recruit Training Command.

 

The Recruit Training Command was originally composed of the following departments:

a. Examining and Outfitting Unit

b. Primary Training Camps

c. Two Advanced Training Camps

d. Recruit Transfer Unit (Camp Paul Jones}

e. Physical Training Division

f. Rifle Range and Small Arm s

g. Recognition and Lookout Division

h. Training Aids Division

i. Fire Fighting Division

j. Seamanship Division

k. Four Training Camp Regimental Headquarters

 

The latter part of the pre -war period marked the beginning of a period of expansion which was to triple the area of the station and to increase the station population five-fold by the end of 1942. The Recruit Training Command now consists of the following departments and divisions, with a rifle range at Camp Elliott Annex where recruits are trained in the firing of small arms.

 

I. Special Assistants

 

a. Administration

b. Receiving

c. Material and Fiscal

d. Personnel

e. Legal

 

II. Training Department

 

a. Special Assistants

 

(1) Instructor Training

(2) Recruit Prepatory Training

(3) Training Aids

(4) Testing

(5) Scheduling

 

b. Technical Training

 

(1) Indoctrination

(2) Damage Control

(3) Seamanship

(4) Ordnance and Gunnery

(5) Physical Training

 

c. Military Training

 

(1) Regiment I

 

(aa) Camp Decatur
        (1) Battalions I through V

        (2) Two Weeks Training (Reserve)

 

(2) Regiment II

 

(aa) Inactive

 

(3) Regiment III

 

(aa) Camp Farragut

 

(1)   Battalions I through VI

(2)    

(bb) Camp Nimitz

 

(1)   Battalions I through V

(2)    

Liaison with other commands aboard the Naval Training Center; Recruit Training Command, Service School Command, Naval Administrative Command is accomplished on all levels of command. Liaison with other commands outside Naval Training Center is largely a function of the

Center Commander and his staff.

 


 

COMMAND HISTORICAL REPORT

PAR T III

RECOGNITION OF ACCOMPLISHMENTS

REFER TO NAVAL TRAINING CENTER "LOG”

COMMAND HISTORICAL REPORT

PART IV

PARTICIPATION IN SPECIAL OR JOINT PROJECTS OR EXERCISES,

IF APPLICABLE

INCLUDE ROUTINE PROJECTS OR EXERCISES

ONLY WHEN OF PARTICULAR INTEREST

NOT APPLICABLE

 

COMMAND HISTORICAL REPORT

PART V

GENERAL STATEMENT OF SPECIAL TRAINING CONDUCTED, IF APPLICABLE

RESERVE TRAINING

I Objectives

a. To develop in the recruit a knowledge and understanding of Naval Life based on actual living experiences in regular Navy Activity.

b. To provide training which will enable recruits to accomplish certain practical factors required for advancement to apprentice rates and to develop skill in technical subjects to the extent that time will permit.

II Programs

a. Two week personnel are trained in a special reserve unit; however the plan of the day conforms closely to the daily schedule for regular navy.

b. Nine week reservists are as signed to a regular navy company and complete the full course of training. These men are given apprentice grade upon completion.

 

COMMAND HISTORICAL REPORT

PART VI

LOCATION OF HEADQUARTERS

Headquarters of Recruit Training Command was located in Building #210 from 28 March 1944 to 13 April 1958. On 14 April 1958 it moved to Building #328 (R-4) its present headquarters.

 

COMMAND HISTORICAL REPORT

PART VII

ACCOUNT OF UNIQUE OR UNUSUAL EVENTS OR ACCOMPLISHMENTS

INCLUDING VISITS OF SPECIAL SIGNIFICANCE

REFER TO NAVAL TRAINING CENTER "LOG"

COMMAND HISTORICAL REPORT

CHRONOLOGICAL RECORD OF COMMANDING OFFICERS

WITH PERIODS OF SERVICE

RECRUIT TRAINING COMMAND

CHRONOLOGICAL RECORD OF COMMANDING OFFICERS

NAME   RANK  FROM  TO
SHADE, Simon L. Commander                        28 Mar 1944 29 Mar 1946
RICHTER, Henry E.  Captain                        29 Mar 1946 30 Apr 1949
MALONE, Louis T. Captain                        30 Apr 1949  1 May 1951
COPELAND, Thomas H. Captain                        1 May 1951 12 Jul 1952
J THOMAS, Donald I. Captain                        12 Jul1952  22 May 1954
CAMPBELL, Herbert J Captain                        22 May 1954 8 Sept 1956
DORNIN, Robert E. Captain                        8 Sept 1956 24 Jul 1959

                                                               

 

COMMAND HISTORICAL REPORT

ENCLOSURE (2)

BRIEF BIOGRAPHY OF OFFICER CURRENTLY IN COMMAND

BIOGRAPHY ON CAPTAIN ROBERT E. DORNIN , USN

Captain Dornin’s Navy career began upon his graduation from the Naval Academy in 1935. As a midshipman, he won laurels as an outstanding end on the Academy's football team and was selected for All-America honors.

Prior to his graduation from the Submarine School, New London, Conn., Captain Dornin served aboard the USS New Mexico, BB-37, and USS Perry, DD-340.

Three consecutive tours of submarine duty followed his completion of Submarine School. He first served in the USS Plunger, SS-179, then the USS Gudgeon, SS-211, and finally the USS Trigger, SS-237.

Captain Dornin won acclaim as an ace submarine skipper during his command of the Trigger. With this ship he conducted one of the outstanding East China Sea patrols of World War II. During the month of September, 1943, he engaged and sank four Japanese ships--two tankers and two cargo ships--and possibly one or two more which did not show up in the record books. Having expended all her torpedoes in nine days of fast action, Trigger headed home, concluding a patrol that came to be called, “a nine-day wonder". The tonnage-sunk total of 27,095 for a single patrol was one of the highest scored by a U. S. submarine to that date.

In 1944, Captain Dornin became an aide to the late Fleet Admiral Ernest J. King, wartime Chief of Naval Operations. After ADM King's retirement, he became Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz' aide.

In 1946 Captain Dornin took command of the USS Sea Fox, SS-402, and from there went back to the Naval Academy as Assistant Director of Athletics. Since then he has served as Commander Submarine Division 22; Chief of Staff, Officer Submarine Development Group; Executive Officer, U. S. Naval Station, Treasure Island; Commanding Officer, USS Nereus, .AS-17, and most recently, Commander Submarine Squadron Three, Pacific Fleet. He now is  Commanding Officer, Recruit Training Command, at the U. S. Naval Training Center in San Diego.

During his eventful career as a submariner, Captain Dornin has won two Navy Crosses, four Silver Stars, three Commendation ribbons and the Submarine Combat Pin with 9 stars.

Captain Dornin and his wife Eleanor, now reside in Quarters “D” at the Training Center.


 

Camps, Courts and Places

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